PSP’s Problem Was Too Many Ports

PlayStation Vita

PSP didn’t do well because there were too many ports.

I love PSP. It’s a nice lil’ system that had a lot of potential, but it wasn’t fully realized.

Speaking with the fine folks at Gamasutra, Sony VP of marketing John Koller said that while the PSP and Sony’s current handheld, the Vita, share the whole “console experience in your hands” concept, he feels developers were taking that concept a bit too far.

“The issue that happened with PSP is we got overrun with ports. It became very difficult for us to define what made PSP unique. The content development became a bit unstructured or decentralised, in that we got a lot of content that was on PlayStation 2 and got thrown over to the handheld.”

Sony reps have said in the past that they’ve learned from the mistakes they’ve made with the PSP, and to that end, are encouraging developers to do a bit more.

“Follow what Ubisoft is doing with Assassin’s Creed. Follow what Activision is doing with Call of Duty.

“The messaging is similar [between PSP and PS Vita], but I think the output is going to be quite different.”

Ya know what else would make things different? If there were more games!

PSP was a nice lil’ system with some fun games, but there weren’t enough of them here in North America. As a result, the PSP market withered out and folks just moved on to the next best thing. If Sony wants the Vita to succeed, not only do they have to ask developers to create new experiences on the Vita that they can’t get elsewhere, but they must ensure that there’s plenty of those experiences on the Vita. Oh, and making the Vita a wee bit more affordable would help too, methinks.

Source: Gamasutra, via Games Industry International

History Repeats Itself… With More News

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Ya really think that Sony’s learnt their lesson and will really start pushing out more original games on Vita? You think more developers will follow suit? Share your thoughts in the Comments Section!